Father Figure is a band that’s me and Matty

Father Figure is a band that’s me and Matty

Corwin Peck / Work

(Source: wearethewebsites)

Full Transcript of Breakthrough Radio Interview Re: 285 Kent

I was contacted by a reporter about this petition I wrote: https://www.change.org/petitions/jay-z-and-beyonce-save-285-kent

He didn’t publish the whole thing, not sure why. 

Hi Zach - 

Thanks for getting in touch. Here are some answers for you. Please do not quote me in excerpt.
Is this the first petition you’ve ever written? What inspired you to include Jay-Z and Beyonce?
This is not the first petition I’ve ever written. This is not even the first fake petition I’ve ever written. In fact, I write fake petitions like this one all the time. It’s a way of bridging what I call “radical slacktivism” with things I actually care about, generating commentary on these admittedly insular issues by the absurdity of the prospect that anyone would maintain hope for a possibility such as Jay Z and Beyonce swooping in to save a marginally profitable space. Why would they do that? They had a stake in Barclay’s, for god’s sake. The truth of the matter was that 285 Kent did not close because of money and this fake petition was intentionally misguided.

How do you think the closing of 285 Kent could affect the DIY community?
To answer this question, I’m going to cite, in part, Mos Def’s “Fear Not of Man:” “Listen.. people be askin me all the time / ‘Yo Mos, what’s gettin ready to happen with Hip-Hop?’ / (Where do you think Hip-Hop is goin?) / I tell em, ‘You know what’s gonna happen with Hip-Hop? / Whatever’s happening with us’ / If we smoked out, Hip-Hop is gonna be smoked out / If we doin alright, Hip-Hop is gonna be doin alright / People talk about Hip-Hop like it’s some giant livin in the hillside / comin down to visit the townspeople / We (are) Hip-Hop / Me, you, everybody / we are Hip-Hop / So Hip-Hop is goin where we goin / So the next time you ask yourself where Hip-Hop is goin / ask yourself.. where am I goin? How am I doin?”
Did you anticipate your petition would get the amount of attention that it has so far? How likely do you think its success will be?
The only amount of attention I wanted my fake petition to get was 285 signatures. When it went beyond that, I was pretty teed off. However, I did take issue with the Brooklyn Magazine piece on my fake petition. The author wrote: “[…] whoever wrote this couldn’t come up with anyone more interesting than Grimes for a hypothetical week-long residency.” I chose Grimes as the apogee artist in my fake petition because she recently had signed to Roc Nation. This was not a matter of “interesting” or “artistic.” 285 Kent closing and Grimes signing to Roc Nation have more in common than we’d like to think — it’s the intersection of two perceived-disparate cultural strata.   

Some critics have stated that asking for money from millionaires goes against what the scene at 285 was all about. How do you feel about this reaction?

I feel great that critics responded to my fake petition.

Tell me one of the craziest stories you’ve experienced at the venue.
The wording of this question is odd. But I know what you’re asking, and it’s hard to answer because 285 Kent wasn’t any more “crazy” than any other venue. It was just better. I think I’ve seen more shows there than any other venue in America. So anything I could have experienced that was “crazy,” i.e. odd for the “best” space, would be the “worst” thing. So by rational standards, the “worst” thing I experienced at this music venue was getting beat up at an Iceage show while someone lit firecrackers in the pit. Long live 285 Kent. 
How do you think the Brooklyn DIY scene will evolve in the years ahead?
#FF @TheMoney
Best,
dwe

A Number of Thoughts on How Social Media Has Warped Me

jeremydlarson:

Maybe this is the year I wean myself off social media and become a member of the hermetically sealed off-the-grid society. That’s the dream, the Walden-esque dream of puttering about in a sugar shack surrounded by great cedars and pines and of course maples, wearing oversized cable-knit sweaters…

entergodmode:

COMMON INTERESTS WERE NOT ENOUGH TO KEEP US TOGETHER
godmode valentine’s day compilation
a not exactly subtle breakup with ourselves
16 more or less brand new songs
the debut recordings ofSHAMIR (vegas-born gospel house, what a voice), FITNESS (fucked up depeche mode vibes), SOFT LIT (have you ever been honestly in love?), FATHER FIGURE (mina said it sounds like ‘braveheart’, all i hear is ‘waterworld’)
new music and other left turns fromTHE FLAG, COURTSHIP RITUAL, SLEEPIES, FASANO, MR. DREAM
deep cuts fromALAN WATTS, YVETTE
out 14 feb 14
reverse-printed j-card “story art” a/k/a “the new look” a/k/a “fuck all y’all for ripping off the stamps”
c-60 pink cassette limited to 100, hand-numbered, etc.
press contact nbs at entergodmode dot com
i have photos of these people
most of them anyway
GODMODE CAT NO GM054.
'common interests' available now for $6.50 at the GODMODE shop
sure we’ll send you mp3s 
just give us a minute
fondly
nick & talya

entergodmode:

COMMON INTERESTS WERE NOT ENOUGH TO KEEP US TOGETHER

godmode valentine’s day compilation

a not exactly subtle breakup with ourselves

16 more or less brand new songs

the debut recordings of
SHAMIR (vegas-born gospel house, what a voice), FITNESS (fucked up depeche mode vibes), SOFT LIT (have you ever been honestly in love?), FATHER FIGURE (mina said it sounds like ‘braveheart’, all i hear is ‘waterworld’)

new music and other left turns from
THE FLAG, COURTSHIP RITUAL, SLEEPIES, FASANO, MR. DREAM

deep cuts from
ALAN WATTS, YVETTE

out 14 feb 14

reverse-printed j-card “story art” a/k/a “the new look” a/k/a “fuck all y’all for ripping off the stamps”

c-60 pink cassette limited to 100, hand-numbered, etc.

press contact nbs at entergodmode dot com

i have photos of these people

most of them anyway

GODMODE CAT NO GM054.

'common interests' available now for $6.50 at the GODMODE shop

sure we’ll send you mp3s 

just give us a minute

fondly

nick & talya

richardgin:

Good morning internet friends! I am pleased and proud to announce Shea (‪#‎SHEA‬ on Instragram, #SHEA on the Twitter. Don’t use hashtags on Facebook), my new zine is DONE and for SALE to YOU! Pix and ordering information in the link below. 

A brief description: 

5 years of pictures from one of my favorite places in New York, Shea Stadium — in both its incarnations. Screaming; hollering; screamhollering. Bodies, oh God, the bodies — they are everywhere and they are all young and beautiful. The best friends you will ever have on the best night of your life. Handsome covers printed in glowing silver ink by my good friends at ACME Letterpress. 

Please consider ordering this if you owe me, in lieu of drinks.

Please consider ordering this for your nieces and nephews if you are afraid they will end up boring. 

Please consider ordering this if you are in it, because soon you will be burdened with responsibilities and a job and being in a smelly room on a Tuesday doesn’t sound as fun as a new episode of NCIS.

I love you all. 

Order:

First edition numbered and limited to 105 copies:


https://www.etsy.com/listing/176143045/shea

(via gimmetinnitus)

(Source: ramoad, via emma-k-clementine)

kylermartz:

Commission piece for my dude @kjphotos1022 📷

kylermartz:

Commission piece for my dude @kjphotos1022 📷

(Source: masspalace, via risingtensions)

(Source: exponentialtitillations)

Lou Reed, New York, and Me

When I wrote about and photographed the Lou Reed memorial at Lincoln Center for CBS Radio Dot Com, I tried not to interject my own feelings on the matter. Rather, my goal was to capture the overall feeling of that day. Or maybe I had simply been ignoring how I felt about Lou passing. To be honest, I didn’t start listening to The Velvet Underground until late high school and early college, that period when your horizons expand because you sort-of force them too. (My dad was more into jazz and Zeppelin and the Stones, my mom into folk and The Beatles. I got into second-wave punk and hardcore pretty early and derailed from there. We missed the Velvets as a family.) Though I do love Lou’s music very much—“Walk On The Wild Side” was the first song I played at my brother’s funeral, believe it or not—he’s not the cornerstone of mine that he is to so many others. However, I’ve felt an immense lack in the months since his death.

I met Lou Reed exactly twice. The first was at the penthouse of what was then the Cooper Square Hotel (now called The Standard East). I was covering the album release party for Laurie Anderson’s amazing Homeland album for the New York Press party column Bash Compactor. There were a ton of notables there: Antony Hegarty, Marina Abramovic, RoseLee Goldberg, Timothy Greenfield-Sanders. They were all dressed beautifully in black, sometimes ornately, with that presence and grace you expect from art-world wonders.

But it made me physically shake to see Lou across the room, wearing a khaki tracksuit and trainers and big glasses, drinking a wine glass full of ice and Coke. For some reason, I didn’t fathom that Lou would show to a celebration of his own wife’s most notable work in years. My editor at the time, Jerry Portwood, was there too, and he encouraged me to talk to Lou. So I went up to him in a vulnerable moment near the end of the event. I as much as stole his hand away in a nervous fit and said to him, “Mr. Reed, I am such a huge fan.” He looked at me with that Lou Reed look without so much as stopping to walk, said, “thanks,” in the abrupt, blase way you might expect him to, and tore his hand away from mine. I felt idiotic.

The second time I “met” Lou was on a cold night in the East Village. I was hurrying to a happy hour to meet some writers or something and peeled around the corner of Avenue A and 14th Street. I ran directly into Lou, wearing a dark peacoat and glasses much smaller than the previous pair I’d seen him in. I don’t think his gaze had changed at all since he had started doing Tai Chi, and this moment was no different: he held that stoic Lou Reed look that appeared in so many photographs. “Hey there,” he said, so, so calmly. I stopped for just a brief second and hurried on, not really realizing what had just happened: his cohort had laughed and it was kind of embarrassing, at least to me, for my rush to drink. I felt idiotic.

You see a lot of celebrities on the streets of New York City. But after having lived here for about five years, I can say you don’t actively look for celebrities, even early on. Except for Lou. I actively looked for Lou. Both those run-ins happened in the first twelve months of my life in New York. As innocuous as they were, they were signal moments, proof that even as stupid and inept as I was that I could rub shoulders—even briefly, on the street— with the people who paved the way for the dumb shit I was trying to get up to. I swear I saw Lou cross 7th Avenue a thousand times. I swear I saw him on the R train every weekend. I swear I saw him at two different Spiritualized shows. I swear that was him eating a burger at The Spotted Pig (that actually might have been him). He’s the one person, as idolized or as not, that held a presence in my mind to direct my gaze at strangers and palpitate something in my idle mind that there is still the possibility of a meaningful anything in this city.

It’s only been in the last couple weeks that I’ve actively had to stop looking for Lou. It’s the echo of death, this one ringing not in my soul, as the death of my brother has, but in my hope, in the streets of New York City, in the dissolution of possibility. Now, when I cast my doubletake down a subway car or across the street at a curly-haired bespectacled old codger, I have to tell myself, after the initial moment of joy: “No. There is no possible way that is Lou Reed.” This city is different now.

(Source: fuckheads, via risingtensions)

$666$666$666$666$666$666$666$666$666$666
:D

$666$666$666$666$666$666$666$666$666$666

:D

Lost at Sea Triplet (to be played simultaneously)

wearethewebsites:

entergodmode:

DALE W EISINGER ENTERS GODMODE
we are thrilled to announce the addition of dale w eisinger to the godmode family
dale is:
-a brilliant writer
-an infuriating photographer
-the best drummer
he joins us as the director of special projects and other provocations
he is from idaho
follow him here
read his eyewitness account of the big snow shooting and aftermath here
look for his ‘saturday 6am’ photobook in the near future (above photo taken from the series)
you can email dale at dwe at entergodmode dot com

entergodmode:

DALE W EISINGER ENTERS GODMODE


we are thrilled to announce the addition of dale w eisinger to the godmode family

dale is:

-a brilliant writer

-an infuriating photographer

-the best drummer

he joins us as the director of special projects and other provocations

he is from idaho

follow him here

read his eyewitness account of the big snow shooting and aftermath here

look for his ‘saturday 6am’ photobook in the near future (above photo taken from the series)

you can email dale at dwe at entergodmode dot com